MedShare featured on Groupon for Good! Donate now.

On January 31 – February 2, MedShare is the featured Groupon for Good campaign in the Atlanta and Athens markets. Donate $10 – which will be matched by MedShare – to send much needed medical supplies to Nepal. The link is: http://www.groupon.com/deals/gt-medshare-1.

G-Team is Groupon’s main philanthropic program designed to help their subscribers discover local causes in their own neighborhoods. In the same way that Groupon deals make it easier for people to discover their cities, G-Team campaigns make it easier for individuals to come together with others to do good, have fun, and make a real impact.

Click through to donate:

MedShare’s reason for participation is two-fold: we will be raising money to help sponsor a container of medical supplies and equipment to Nepal, and we’ll also be raising awareness of MedShare and our mission in Atlanta by utilizing Groupon’s huge subscriber base.

We encourage you to share the link with your friends and family via email, Facebook and Twitter. We need 50 people to buy into this deal @ $10 for MedShare to receive the donations. It will be live through Thursday, February 2nd.

Let’s see if we can make this the most successful Groupon charity campaign ever!

Volunteer Jack Horvath Prepares Boxes of Medical Supplies

Longtime MedShare volunteer Jack Horvath tapes boxes of medical supplies packed by other volunteers. These boxes will be sent to hospitals in need around the world.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BjIjV4Kze0

Does this inspire you to volunteer? Click here to sign up – we’d love to have you!

In Haiti, Fate Coincides Arrival of Atlanta Nonprofit’s Medical Shipment with Fatal Wreck

Shortly before midnight in Haiti on Monday, a truck’s brakes failed and it crashed into a small bus, then careened onto the sidewalk of one of Port-au-Prince’s busiest streets. An estimated 29 people were killed and 67 were injured. Fate coincided a same-day arrival of an ocean container of medical supplies and equipment, which will enable many to receive lifesaving treatment.

The oft-undersupplied Port-au-Prince’s Hopital General, where many of the survivors were taken, is able to provide treatment thanks to the Atlanta-based nonprofit MedShare.

“I thank you for the first container which arrived at a perfect time. The First Lady has ordered retrieval of the container immediately. There was a terrible accident in Port-au-Prince on Monday evening … The Hopital General in the city needs a lot of supplies,” says Mona Adam, Nurse, Special Envoy of the First Lady of Haiti, Sophie Martelly.

The ocean container was sent from MedShare, an Atlanta-based nonprofit that recovers and redistributes medical supplies and equipment. The container was sponsored by a metro Atlanta not-for-profit hospital. The container left Atlanta on December 1, 2011 and arrived in Haiti on January 16, 2012.

“The 1,000+ boxes of supplies on this shipment will make a difference to Haitians in their time of emergency,” says Meridith Rentz, CEO of MedShare. “Both before and after the 2010 earthquake, Haiti has held a special place in the heart of our organization, and we are committed to the ongoing strengthening of their healthcare system.”

In the organization’s 14 years, MedShare has shipped a total of 72 ocean containers containing over $8.8 million worth of medical supplies and equipment to Haiti. The most recent container left on January 11, 2012.

CEO Corner: MedShare in New York

On December 8th, 2011, MedShare’s New York Regional Council hosted a dinner at The University Club to welcome MedShare to New York. Our CEO and President Meridith Rentz gave an inspiring speech which we wanted to share.

“As Seth [Zachary, MedShare Trustee] shared, I have 3 little boys…..they were certainly a key motivation for me to become a part of this extraordinary MedShare team. I am delighted and honored to be here this evening to share more about the important work MedShare does every day.

Are there any other mothers in the room? What about fathers? Daughters? Sons? Brothers? Sisters? Okay – I think we’ve covered just about everyone. Close your eyes please – just for a moment. Imagine, if you will, being a pregnant mother at term and going to your local hospital only to find out that in order to deliver your baby you must go to the store and purchase the supplies you need in order to ensure a safe and successful delivery – but you have no money to do so. This is a common occurrence at a hospital in Uganda. Now, imagine delivering a premature baby only to find out the hospital doesn’t have an incubator and so your child will be transported in a shoe box by a motorcycle ambulance to another hospital in order to get the care she needs. This happens every day in Haiti. Now imagine your brother being in surgery and the anesthesia machine failing. This happened in Colombia. Fathers, imagine losing your son because the hospital at which he was born didn’t have something as simple as this, an endotracheal tube with infant resuscitation mask. This happened in Niger.

MedShare CEO Meridith Rentz speaking at the NY Benefit

These are difficult stories to hear. This past September, when the special envoy from the office of the First Lady of Haiti visited us at MedShare, she told us about the motorcycle transport of low birth weight infants. After she finished speaking, there wasn’t a dry eye in the room. Those stories sit heavy, so heavy on your heart. If these situations were to occur in the United States, the outrage would be instantaneous and enormous. Lawyers would be called. Politicians would be stirred up. Op-eds would be written. Protests staged. Unfortunately, – and perhaps even outrageously – this is the status quo in many developing countries. A hospital or clinic may have the most talented, the most committed doctors and nurses in the world……but if they don’t have the critical supplies and equipment, there is often little they can do to save the lives of those patients that depend on them.

While we certainly have some challenges with our health system here in the United States, we are typically not lacking for supplies. In fact, as was shared in the videos, the US health system throws away millions of tons of medical waste per year, much of which is useful surplus created as a result of procedural excess and our regulatory environment. Surely we’re capable of finding a way to recover these items and get them into the hands of talented medical professionals caring for the mother in Uganda, the children in Haiti and Niger, and the brothers and sisters in Colombia.

Well, I have good news. In this case, we don’t need a protest; we don’t need op-eds; we don’t require the help of politicians. You see – MedShare is that bridge between our U.S. surplus and the tremendous need across the developing world. Here is the same endotracheal tube with infant resuscitation mask that the doctor in Niger needed to save a child’s life. It would have gone to a landfill if MedShare didn’t have the systems in place to recover it. We have hundreds of these items in our inventory right now and they are being ordered every day by the recipients we serve. We are taking something that is being discarded right here, every day by New York hospitals and getting it to a place where it can mean the difference between life and death.

The MedShare concept is simple – we take something that is no longer useful in one context and get it to another where it is. A place where it can improve healthcare and save lives. We do this in a way that values the dignity of the recipients and actually allows them to choose box by box exactly what they need. This high quality, responsible model that was developed carefully and thoughtfully by co-founders A.B. Short and Bob Freeman 13 years ago has been lauded through national studies by the Catholic Health Association and others.

Simple, yet powerful. Simple, and yet it takes a lot to make this happen. In order to create that bridge between surplus and need, MedShare needs hospital partners; we need suppliers and manufacturers; we need thousands of volunteers; and MedShare needs financial support. We need help from you.

In our early days, we recognized that there was nothing unique about the medical surplus in Atlanta, and our Board committed to developing an organization that – when appropriate – could be replicated and expanded into other communities. As Seth mentioned, the New York Tri-State area has more hospitals than any other market in the United States. This need was confirmed as part of a national pro bono expansion study conducted for MedShare by Accenture. So MedShare has developed a world-class, proven model and New York has the largest potential medical surplus in the U.S. that is not being systematically and comprehensively gathered. Any way you look at that equation, it points to the fact that hundreds of thousands of lives can be saved if MedShare joins this New York community and works in partnership with all you and many others.

In fact, even before we have had a chance to set up a facility here, we have been overwhelmed by the support of our tremendous New York Council, led by the extraordinarily committed Sandy Tytel. We were extremely honored to be selected by the North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, one of the largest nonprofit health systems in the nation, to handle their surplus supply and equipment donations. Already, we have 80 collection sites throughout the system. North Shore LIJ “champions” have been to Atlanta for training, and have taken that knowledge back to train their staff to utilize this program. We recently processed a donation of 400 late model hospital beds from North Shore LIJ. Thanks to the The Coca-Cola Africa Foundation’s sponsorship, 150 of those beds have already been shipped to Accra, Ghana, to benefit needy hospitals there. We have another shipment planned to benefit a series of clinics in Peru scheduled for January. We have also received donations of IV pumps and poles from North Shore and are in the process of handling donations of baby incubators, anesthesia machines, and other useful equipment. Soon, this equipment and supplies will be in the hands of doctors and nurses across Africa and South America and will quite literally allow them to save lives.

MedShare has worked with Dennis Lynch and Sandy Tytel to send a container to Sunyani, Ghana, to benefit the charity health care facilities operated by the Catholic Church. Our MedShare team has worked with New York Drs. Julius Garvey and Allan Abramson to send a container to Jamaica and we are engaged in a project with North Shore LIJ employees from Sierra Leone to send a container there. With the support of excellent product manufacturers and distributors like Henry Schein, Covidien and Kimberly-Clark, we are able to supplement our recovered supplies with newly manufactured product.

While substantial, these results garnered over the past 6 months barely scratch the surface of MedShare’s potential community impact in New York. As we grow our physical presence in this market and establish a distribution center, we will be able to equip local medical teams, send hundreds of containers of medical supplies, and divert millions of cubic feet of medical surplus from area landfills. We will also create thousands of volunteer and civic engagement opportunities to mobilize the residents of the New York Tri-State Region in meaningful, high impact service. The potential is enormous.

Just like with any new venture in the for-profit world, before we can proceed with this next exciting phase in the New York market, we must attract seed capital and develop the key relationships required to support the MedShare model. We need introductions to hospitals, potential philanthropic donors, and volunteer, religious and civic groups who might want to become involved in MedShare’s mission.

I began my remarks by talking about real, specific stories that members of the MedShare team have experienced over the years. Unfortunately, those stories are not the exception to the norm – rather, the need in developing countries is truly exponential. There are 7 billion people living in the world today and billions of them live in poverty on less than $2 per day. Simply put, this world of ours needs more MedShare. This world – more specifically, mothers in Uganda, children in Haiti and Colombia, families in Niger, and countless others – they need the support of this New York community.

As you step up to this challenge, you have our commitment that MedShare will continue to be the bridge between New York medical surplus and tremendous need in developing countries. We will work hand-in-hand with the New York community, to save lives around the world, and keep surplus from ending up in your area landfills. On behalf of the millions of women, men and children whose lives have already been improved by MedShare supplies and equipment, THANK YOU for all you have done and all that I know you will do to help us to fulfill our mission of bridging the gap between surplus and need.”

This was part of our December 2011 newsletter. To view the rest – including stories on our expansion into NY and FL and our new videos – click here.

Mid-December Western Region Volunteers

At MedShare, we’re lucky to host over 18,000 volunteers a year. These generous people and groups help us sort and box the 20,000 lbs of medical supplies that we collect weekly from our hospital and manufacturer partners. The sheer volume of work they provide for MedShare is incredible, and we don’t hesitate to say that our work wouldn’t be possible without them.

 Today, we’d like to recognize a few groups who’ve recently volunteered in our Western Region.

On December 17, these Hugh O'Brien Youth Leadership volunteers sorted drapes and packed 77 boxes.

On December 16, Kaiser-Performance Excellence volunteers sorted 741 lbs and packed 50 boxes.

On December 15, Kaiser Permanente volunteers sorted 439 lbs and packed 47 boxes.

We’d like to recognize our volunteers for another accomplishment. On Tuesday, December 20, the Western Region had one of its biggest sorting days ever!  Regular volunteers and groups from OSISoft, Nektar, and the Bay Oaks Blasters packed an impressive 664 boxes and sorted 5,500 lbs.

These volunteers are part of the group that packed 664 boxes and sorted 5,500 lbs on December 20.

These volunteers are part of the group that packed 664 boxes and sorted 5,500 lbs on December 20.

These volunteers are part of the group that packed 664 boxes and sorted 5,500 lbs on December 20.

If you’d like to sign up to volunteer, click here. Thanks again to everyone pictured here, and the many others who aren’t.

2012 On the Horizon: A Year for Expansion

This is the time of year for reflection, thankfulness, and gratitude, and also the time to chart our goals for the year to come. What’s on our radar? In two words: gratitude and expansion.

MedShare Trustee Dan Goldberg and CAO David Pass with John Stamos and the Beach Boys

We must first look back before looking forward. We at MedShare have a lot to be proud of this calendar year. In the 2011, we hosted more volunteers, supplied more medical mission teams, and turned over more supplies than in previous years. We continued with our environmental focus, hired a new CEO, instituted a regional council in New York, and not only shipped containers of life-saving medical supplies and equipment to 40+ countries, but also supported our own country by shipping two containers to Alabama in response to April’s devastating tornadoes. Most importantly, we shipped more containers than ever before, and in doing so, had a positive impact on an incredible number of lives around the world. In essence, we have successfully continued to bridge the gap between surplus and need this year.

Much time and energy went into our achievements, and we’d like to recognize those that have made this year’s successes possible. Thanks to A.B. Short, our co-founder and former CEO, for the vision you and Bob Freeman had 13 years ago. Thanks to the Board of Trustees for driving the search to bring in Meridith Rentz, our new CEO and President. Thanks to Meridith for the talent, passion and tireless energy you bring, and your commitment to take the organization to the next level. Thanks to our hospital and corporate partners for the supplies, equipment, and services you give; without them, our work wouldn’t be possible. Thanks to our incredibly generous supporters for allowing us to have a successful year of development in a down economy. Thanks to our volunteers for your dedication in sorting and packing countless boxes of supplies. Thanks to all MedShare employees for tirelessly working to better ourselves and others. Thanks to our recipients for partnering with us towards the common goal of improving healthcare worldwide. And finally, thanks to those that have contributed towards our potential expansion into South Florida and the Mid-Atlantic.

In the words of our recipients: merci; gracias; mesi, obrigado; cảm ơn ông; shukran; amesege’nallo’; naa goodee; tenk-kee; ngiyabonga; asante.

We have achieved much, but we can do more still. We can save more lives and space from landfills, and strengthen more healthcare systems. We can give more volunteers a meaningful experience and engage more hospitals and corporations in partnership.

To do all this, we are strongly exploring our expansion opportunities in two markets: South Florida and the New York Tri-State Region. MedShare was recently introduced to both communities through events held in each region.

On October 27, 2011, MedShare Trustee Daniel Goldberg hosted a Beach Boys concert at SPIN Ultra Lounge benefiting our expansion efforts into Florida. The event was well-attended, not only by the Beach Boys and John Stamos, but also by a generous local crowd. Thanks to all who made it possible! Click here to view photos of the event, and here to learn how you can help bring MedShare to Florida. We are currently working with consultants in the region to meet prospective partners, and hope to enter the region in 2013.

On December 8, 2011, the MedShare New York Regional Council hosted an event at The University Club to introduce MedShare to the region. We’d like to give a special thanks to Seth Zachary, Chairman of Paul Hastings, Sandy Tytel, Council Chair, Laureen Knutson, Anita MacDougall, Jackie Wasp, and Olivia Ayala for the event’s success. Ms. Rentz gave an inspiring speech to the attendees that conveyed the great need for a MedShare in New York. The New York Tri-State area has more hospitals than any other market in the United States, and MedShare has developed a world-class, proven model. This is an equation that would add up to hundreds of thousands of lives saved were MedShare to enter the region in 2012. Click here to read Ms. Rentz’s speech, here to view photos from the event, and here to learn how you can help with the effort.

You – our stakeholders and supporters – are the fuel for the MedShare mission. You’ve enabled us to achieve more, and we are so grateful for everything you’ve done. We hope you’ll join us in the coming year as we grow our model and have an even greater impact.

This was part of our December 2011 newsletter. To view the rest – including our new videos and a great last minute gift idea – click here.

Mid-December Container Shipment Announcements

Mid-December Container Shipment Announcements

To view November’s Container Shipment Announcements, click here.