Chattahoochee Technical College Students Outfit Bus with Medical Equipment for Africa

It is only through partnerships that we are able to achieve our mission of bridging the gap between surplus and need. Hospitals, schools, clinics, governments and community groups are just some of the groups that make our work possible. It is the partnership of a school, Chattahoochee Technical College, that we’d like to recognize today.

Chattahooche Technical College instructor Mike O’Rear and six of his Biomedical Technology Engineering students spent time refurbishing a University of Georgia-donated bus with biomedical equipment that MedShare provided. The bus will be shipped to Ghana, and used to check for hypertension and diabetes in patients while information is transferred back to the United States for analysis.

For more information on this project, we’d like to share this great patch.com article with you:

CTC Students Outfit Bus with Medical Equipment for Africa

Mike O’Rear and his students from Chattahoochee Technical College installed medical instrumentation on a bus that will be shipped to Ghana.

Chattahoochee Technical College Instructor Mike O’Rear and five of his Biomedical Technology Engineering students saw months of hard work culminate in a ceremony this week. The instructor and students handed off the keys to a bus that has been refurbished as a mobile medical unit with equipment they installed.

Dr. Mike O’Rear and students hand off the keys to Dr. Issifu Harruna of the Kibasibi Foundation and his mother, Amina, whom the bus is named after. Credit Angela Chao

“I was approached by the people at MedShare about doing this project,” explained O’Rear. “They supplied the equipment, and then these students worked to install it and make sure it was working properly.”

O’Rear, along with about six students from Chattahoochee Technical College installed the medical instrumentation on a bus that will be shipped to Ghana. Once there, healthcare workers will utilize the equipment and facility to check for hypertension and diabetes in patients while information is transferred back to the United States for analysis.

Dr. Issifu Harruna of the Kibasibi Foundation was on hand to see the now completed bus, which was once used to transport students at the University of Georgia. According to Harruna, the bus will be used primarily in rural Ghana. The bus is named after Harruana’s mother, Amina, who accepted the keys to the bus.

The bus is outfitted with cabinets for storage and medical equipment. Credit Chattahoochee Technical College

This is not the first international project for O’Rear, who traveled to Africa in 2008 with MedShare—an organization that collects donated medical equipment for use in third world countries. However, this is a first chance for many of the students to do such a project.

“This project will help the people of Ghana,” said student project leader Charles Cowan. “It will help the world.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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