Robin Chalmers Finds Friends at MedShare

The following entry was written by Robin Chalmers, regular volunteer at MedShare’s Southeast Distribution & Volunteer Center

Sure, you give a few hours, but what do you get by volunteering at MedShare?

Six years ago when my youngest daughter was heading off to UGA to start college I decided that, as a research consultant who worked from home, I needed to build some added structure into my schedule. I had dabbled in volunteer gigs here and there, but I never felt that I had time to spare. I decided that I should spend it on something constructive instead of wasting it.

2015 Medshare 2

 

So I headed to MedShare in South DeKalb County –I had been there a few times during the Haiti earthquake– and I started a routine of regular Wednesday night sort sessions. Although many volunteers come with a group, I had a job with quite a bit of travel, so I decided to venture by myself. I have never looked back. When you show up solo, it leaves fewer excuses to back out (my friend isn’t going so I won’t go, I can’t organize a buddy to go with me…). Let me tell you, if you show up at MedShare a handful of times by yourself you will find that you’ve made a few friends there before you know it.

For starters, our Volunteer Program Manager, Alvaro McRae, is one of the most open and welcoming people that I know. He’s the steady hand. I’ve seen him with a group of 4 volunteers and with a group of 80, always keeping his cool, patiently answering questions and keeping folks on task without them feeling rushed or pressured. You can quickly count him as a friend. Then, there is Dr. Moctar Bayor, who enlivens the room with a bark that is worse than his bite! All the while smiling and helping volunteers get it right. He’s also your friend before you know it.

But if you return to volunteer a few more times, you’ll make your own MedShare buddies. The sessions can be social or intense, but by the end of 3 hours the group has achieved something that is tangible and will help someone who is facing a health problem in an underserved area.

 

MedShare volunteers range widely in age (10 to 90 or so), neighborhood, race, ethnicity, and reasons for service. It is very easy in a large city like Atlanta to interact only with people like yourself. For me that would be oldish, “inside the perimeter” dwellers who also have empty nests. Without MedShare, I would rarely cross paths with the many new immigrants who come to volunteer, members of small and large churches, members of Beta Clubs in high school, Boy Scouts, expat clubs from Nigeria, college students, the list goes on and on. I admire and appreciate the effort every one has made and hope to see them there the next time.

-Robin Chalmers

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